Ulkatcho First Nation Signs Reconciliation Agreement with Province

Southern Dakelh Nation Alliance and Minister Carolyn_Bennett sign an MOU on July 22, 2018. Photo by Emmaline English.

The Southern Dakelh Nation Alliance, including Ulkatcho First Nation, signed a reconciliation agreement with the provincial government.

The Hubulhsooninats’Uhoot’alh (Foundation Framework Agreement), which is Dakelh for “together we will fix it,” was signed on August 3 and lays a foundation for building a positive relationship based on respect and recognition of rights.

It commits the two governments to work collaboratively on decisions over land and resource management, increasing First Nations economic development and participation in the forest economy, improving consultation on resource development and developing cultures and wellness priorities.

This agreement commits us to working together, deepening our partnership and relationship for the benefit of our youth, our elders and our communities.

The Southern Dakelh Nation Alliance represents Lhoosk’uz Dené Nation (Kluskus), Lhtako Dené Nation (Red Bluff), Nazko First Nation and Ulkatcho Nation (Anahim Lake), which are all based in the Cariboo.

The Foundation Framework Agreement was signed Chief Liliane Squinas, Lhoosk’uz Dené Nation; Chief Clifford Lebrun, Lhtako Dené Nation; Chief Stuart Alec, Nazko First Nation; and Chief Betty Cahoose, Ulkatcho Nation; and by Ministers Scott Fraser and Doug Donaldson, on behalf of the Province.

Ulkatcho Nation Chief Betty Cahoose says the agreement is just the beginning.

“This agreement represents only the beginning. Tomorrow, our work as partners begins to bring tangible benefits to our communities.”

Chief Stuart Alec, of Nazko First Nation says the agreement is an opportunity to work collaboratively. “We are all in one canoe – we can either paddle together or sink together,” he said. “This agreement commits us to working together, deepening our partnership and relationship for the benefit of our youth, our elders and our communities.”

Learn more about Ulkatcho First Nation here.