New Annual Allowable Cut Determined through Haida Nation and Province of B.C. Co-governance

Some of the finest ancient Sitka Spruce and Red Cedar stands are found on the islands of Haida Gwaii. Photo by Huux̱ Percy Crosby.

The Haida Gwaii Management Council (the Management Council) announced on May 5 that it has determined an Allowable Annual Cut (AAC) of 804,000 cubic metres for the Haida Gwaii Management Area. The determination was agreed to by consensus by Management Council members and stems from over three years of detailed data gathering and analysis of Haida Gwaii’s forest inventory and values that affect timber supply in the territory.

The Management Council is a joint decision-making body that was formed in 2011 which includes equal representation from the Haida Nation and the Province of British Columbia. The Management Council is authorized to make joint decisions about resource management issues on Haida Gwaii, including determining the AAC.

“The Haida Gwaii Management Council is a globally recognized example of Indigenous and Crown co-governance, between the Haida Nation and the Province of B.C.,” said Huux Percy Crosby, Haida Nation representative on the Management Council and Coast Funds’ board chair. “In determining these important resource management decisions by consensus, the Management Council provides a model for advancing the protection of vital ecosystems and our culture while we also work at transitioning to a sustainable islands-based economy.”

In determining these important resource management decisions by consensus, the Management Council provides a model for advancing the protection of vital ecosystems and our culture while we also work at transitioning to a sustainable islands-based economy.

The newly released AAC determination rationale document is based on the findings of a 2014-2019 timber supply review period, initiated out of concern over the rate of Western Red Cedar harvesting and the remaining forest inventory on Haida Gwaii. As part of its review process, the Management Council collected over 40 comments from the pubic, industry, municipalities, and other agencies that were considered throughout the Management Council’s analysis and which are reflected in the AAC determination.

“Decisions like this are not easy, and require a balancing of the social, economic, cultural and environmental considerations,” said Sharon Hadway, B.C. provincial representative on the Management Council. “But I can say with confidence that the process of getting here was a genuinely collaborative joint effort and it took into account the views of all members at the table.”

The new AAC determination applies to Haida Gwaii’s Timber Harvesting Land Base which covers 147,746 hectares (15%) of Haida Gwaii.

“I believe the new AAC will maintain ecological integrity on Haida Gwaii and provide a measure of stability for our communities,” said Haida Nation representative, Kung Xyaalas Tyler Bellis.

For more information, read the full Haida Gwaii Management Council media release or visit the Haida Gwaii Management Council website.